Science - Tempo Magazine | English Edition

Science



  • Tsunamiprediction
    Science & Technology

    Tsunamiprediction

    An enormous earthquake shook the bottom of the Indian Ocean on Sunday, December 26, 2004. The tectonic tremors of 9.2 on the Richter scale reached the land of Aceh. In less than an hour, sea waves as high as 30 meters rolled in from of the sea. After engulfing Aceh's shores, the waves devastated half of the province and claimed hundreds of thousands of lives.

    "A quake and tsunami of the Aceh [2004] magnitude can potentially recur in the Mentawai Islands, West Sumatra," said Nugroho Dwi Hananto, a geo-technology researcher from the Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI) to Tempo in his office on Friday two weeks ago.

  • Ancient Fossils in the Oya River
    Science & Technology

    Ancient Fossils in the Oya River

    Thirty-three pitch-black stones the size of matches formed a long figure resembling the femur of a ruminating animal. A team of researchers from the Yogyakarta Archeological Center concluded: it came from an ancient buffalo that lived a million years ago.

    Bambang Duhgita, 45, discovered the fossils while searching for precious stones in the Oya River, around 500 meters from his home in Bejiharjo village, Yogyakartaabout 1.5 kilometers from Pindul Cave, a popular tourist destination.

  • Papua's Biological Treasure Trove
    Science & Technology

    Papua's Biological Treasure Trove

    Clear weather prevailed in Urisa village, West Papua. No rain had fallen for two months in the area when a team of researchers from the Lengguru Expedition arrived in early November last year. In Urisa the group was hospitably welcomed by village residents. Small tents and research posts were promptly erected in the middle of the village. Some team members set up a base camp while others dispersed to gather data on plants, insects, birds and reptiles in forests, rivers, lakes and caves.

  • Papua's Biological Treasure Trove
    Science & Technology

    Papua's Biological Treasure Trove

    Clear weather prevailed in Urisa village, West Papua. No rain had fallen for two months in the area when a team of researchers from the Lengguru Expedition arrived in early November last year. In Urisa the group was hospitably welcomed by village residents. Small tents and research posts were promptly erected in the middle of the village. Some team members set up a base camp while others dispersed to gather data on plants, insects, birds and reptiles in forests, rivers, lakes and caves.

    Lina Juswara, a botanical researcher from the Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI), was aware of the very hot weather in Urisa. Still, the team carried on gathering samples. "It would have been a pity to waste time," Lina told Tempo on January 27. The expedition team only stayed in Urisa for four days. On November 7 last year, they plowed ahead via a sea route to the Kumawa Mountains.

  • 'Green Port' in Surabaya
    Science & Technology

    'Green Port' in Surabaya

    East Java Governor Soekarwo smiled broadly in front of the camera inthe multipurpose terminal of Teluk Lamong, Surabaya, on September 5. Behind him dozens of CNG-fueled trucks busily blinked their sign lights. "Mr. President, in 2016, ships with the capacity of 80,000 tons are expected to be able to get into Teluk Lamong," he said.

    The person he was talking to was in a different location, linked to him via a video feed. Pointing to the background, at the towering automated stacking cranes and ship-to-shore cranes in the distance, Soekarwo said East Java was prepared to become a new generator of economic development. "Belated economy of East Java will affect the economy of eastern Indonesia," he said.

  • Genetically Engineered Menaces
    Science & Technology

    Genetically Engineered Menaces

    Monsanto has been involved in Indonesia for more than 25 years, beginning in 1987 with the Roundup brand of agricultural herbicide. Our business has since expanded to include DEKALB hybrid corn varieties: DK77, DK979, DK85, DK95, DK888 and DK999, offering farmers with superior yield performance and served to more than 650,000 farmers across Indonesia," the company boasts on its website.

    But it had looked suspicious when the highly praised seeds, 40 tons genetically modified Bollgard cotton seed, some 12 years ago arrived for the first time with a Russian Ilyusin transport plane in Makassar under the heavy guard of Indonesian military personnel. Reporters were asked to back off. "People should not worry about the negative impact of the crops," Monsanto's communications manager Tri Soekirman said. "There have been no complaints from the U.S., South Africa, China and Argentina (where genetically modified cotton has been grown)."

  • A New Diabetes TreatmentFrom Purple Yams?
    Science & Technology

    A New Diabetes TreatmentFrom Purple Yams?

    Five students from Brawijaya University in Malang, East Java, have discovered that a cure for diabetes might be obtained by processing a substance called anthocyanin found in the peel of purple yam.

    "This waste product provides abundant raw material for medical purposes through extraction," said Akbar Setyo Pambudi, an agricultural engineering major. Along with Yani Rahmawati, Ajeng Nawangwulan, Nabillah Hisyam and Kinanti Mahmud Pradita, Akbar has successfully extracted anthocyanin from purple yam peelings.

  • A Gathering of Great Minds
    Science & Technology

    A Gathering of Great Minds

    Every summer, the scenic Bavarian town of Lindau, Germany, plays host to the geniuses of the world, as they hold a week-long scientific dialogue known as the Lindau Nobel Laureates Meeting. This year, no less than 600 scientists from around 80 countries and 37 Nobel laureates participated in the program, from June 29 to July 4, dedicated to the science of Physiology and Medicine. Tempo was invited to report on this prestigious event and had the chance to talk to some of the brightest minds in their fields.

    Franoise Barr-Sinoussi
    Nobel Laureate in Medicine (2008)

    Brought to worldwide fame by her discovery of HIVshared with colleague Luc MontaignerBarr-Sinoussi now barely has time to herself, as her schedule is fully booked until 2017. In addition to her continuing pursuit of an AIDS cure, she is also a prominent AIDS activist. The French native virologist currently presides over the International AIDS societythe leading association of HIV/AIDS researchers. The following are excerpts of an interview with Barre-Sinoussi.

    People in the developing world have very limited access to antiretroviral treatments. Some who had access had to stop treatments due to a shortage of supplies. This could lead to a reemergence of the HIV epidemic. What would be the best way to resolve this issue?

  • Beware the Arab Flu
    Science & Technology

    Beware the Arab Flu

    World's virus experts are facing a new challenge. After China's bird flu and Hong Kong's acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), a new threat has emerged from the Arabian Peninsula: Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, otherwise known as MERS, the culprit behind the increasingly malignant Arabian flu.

    From the time it was first detected in September 2012 until this week, MERS has infected more than 530 people. Almost a third of them lost their lives. Most cases have turned up in Saudi Arabia and surrounding countries. Two Indonesians are among the victims. Scientists are racing against the clock to find a cure as more and more people have fallen ill to the virus within the last few months.

  • A Grain of Wheat in the Tropics
    Science & Technology

    A Grain of Wheat in the Tropics

    Indonesia's tropical climate is unsuitable for wheat. But gamma ray radiation has enabled wheat cultivation in this country by altering the plant's DNA molecule sequences.

  • A Blessing from Kelud's Eruption
    Science & Technology

    A Blessing from Kelud's Eruption

    The volcanic ash that showered over Yogyakarta after the eruption of Mount Kelud has been shown to help soil retain water longer. It can be used to improve barren areas.

  • The Ancient Genes of Nias People
    Science & Technology

    The Ancient Genes of Nias People

    The Nias ethnic group displays genetic similarities with the indigenous people of Taiwan. A third cluster of Nusantara has been found.

  • Luwak Coffee, Without the Luwak
    Science & Technology

    Luwak Coffee, Without the Luwak

    An IPB researcher succeeds in making luwak coffee in the lab. Its selling price can be lowered and it is more nutritious.

  • Virtually Jakarta
    Science & Technology

    Virtually Jakarta

    The Google Street View project for Jakarta has begun. Will it violate citizens' privacy?

  • The Lake Tarusan Kamang Phenomenon
    Science & Technology

    The Lake Tarusan Kamang Phenomenon

    A grassland in West Sumatra turns into a lake every nine months. Does this have to do with underground rivers?

  • Brakes for Dahlan
    Science & Technology

    Brakes for Dahlan

    Minister Dahlan Iskan's electric car had an accident during a test drive. Using regenerative brakes may be the best alternative.

  • The Crystal Method
    Science & Technology

    The Crystal Method

    The environmental effects of transgenic corn remain controversial, as scientists weigh the potential negative impact of genetically altered crops with their desirable characteristics.

  • The Clove Leafs
    Science & Technology

    The Clove Leafs

    PUTRI Ernia Wati has been troubled by the high number of malaria cases found in her country. Every year, there is an outbreak of up to 1.5 million cases of malaria in Indonesia. Adding to her concern is the fact that Plasmodium falciparum, the malaria parasite commonly found in Indonesia, has become resistant to arteminisinin, a type of malaria medicine which, until now, is believed to be the most effective.

  • Warnings From The Bottom Of The Frying Pan
    Science & Technology

    Warnings From The Bottom Of The Frying Pan

    BPPT's landslide detector works by utilizing inputs from five different sensors. The device has so far been installed in two disaster-prone locations.

  • Luthfi's Measure of Success
    Science & Technology

    Luthfi's Measure of Success

    A high school student in Bogor has invented a tool to measure the correct amount of fertilizers needed for rice paddies.

  • You have 1 free article for this week. Get

    4 free articles after Register.