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Science Technology



  • New Strain of Swine Flu
    Science & Technology

    New Strain of Swine Flu

    Discovery of a new strain of H1N1 swine flu in China rises concern that the 2009 pandemic could reemerge. The new virus may become very dangerous if it manages to transmit itself between humans and acquire highly pathogenic genes.

  • Two Roads to Corona Vaccine
    Science & Technology

    Two Roads to Corona Vaccine

    Indonesia is taking two ways to get the Covid-19 vaccine. Bio Farma and Kalbe Farma are collaborating with vaccine makers from China and South Korea. The Eijkman Institute for Molecular Biology is leading an independent vaccine development.

  • indonesian CoronaVirus
    Science & Technology

    indonesian CoronaVirus

    Indonesia finished whole-genome sequencing of the SARS-CoV-2 virus circulating in the country. Virus samples from Indonesian patients indicate they are part of the dominant group globally.

  • The 12th Tarsier of Togean
    Science & Technology

    The 12th Tarsier of Togean

    It took more than a quarter century to ascertain that the tarsier found on the Togean islands is a completely new species. It was named Tarsius niemitzi in honor of ‘the father of tarsier biology’.

  • Fuel  From Trash
    Science & Technology

    Fuel From Trash

    Solid waste from garbage dumps is being processed into environmentally-friendly fuel. Cement factories are purchasing it to partially replace coal.

  • What Lies Beneath Palu
    Science & Technology

    What Lies Beneath Palu

    Researchers discovered the cause behind the strong magnitude 7.4 Palu earthquake on September 28. There was a jump of seismic energy to a nearby fault

  • Life As a Martian in the Utah Desert
    Science & Technology

    Life As a Martian in the Utah Desert

    An Indonesian citizen participated in a simulation of life on the Red Planet, held in a desert in Utah, United States. The simulation is meant to assess Mars’ feasibility for permanent habitation.

  • Illustrations In Diversity
    Science & Technology

    Illustrations In Diversity

    Indonesia’s biological diversity is not yet well documented in botanical illustrations. There are only a handful of botanical illustrators in the country.

  • Fire at the Jakarta Maritime Museum
    Science & Technology

    Fire at the Jakarta Maritime Museum

    Dozens of invaluable items at the Jakarta Maritime Museum were destroyed in a fire. The building is no longer in appropriate condition for a maritime museum.

  • An Old Dream Comes True
    Science & Technology

    An Old Dream Comes True

    Indonesia will have its first sophisticated micro satellite under a cooperative scheme between the National Aeronautics and Space Institute and Chiba University, Japan. The satellite will be the worlds lightest.

  • Learning About Indonesias Fault Lines
    Science & Technology

    Learning About Indonesias Fault Lines

    A massive earthquake shook Pidie Jaya, Pidie, and Bireun in Aceh province. The fault line from where the quake emerged has not been studied in detail. Neither have hundreds of other faults below Aceh.

  • Reviving Tugu's Portuguese Heritage
    Science & Technology

    Reviving Tugu's Portuguese Heritage

    Iste korsang yo kere intra
    Buska filu yo kere kaja

    Gatu Matu, Keroncong Tugu Cafrinho

    OVER 200 spectators gave a thundering applause in the yard of the Bank Indonesia Museum in the Old Town zone of West Jakarta when the Tugu Cafrinho keroncong group finished the opening song Gatu Matu at the end of July. That afternoon, love songs in the Tugu creole language were presented with violin and cello, macina (four-stringed guitar), jiteira (six-stringed guitar), prounga (smaller six-stringed guitar) and contrabass accompaniment. The lyrics were indeed unfamiliar but the audience seemed to enjoy the show.

    The Tugu creole, the language used in the lyrics, is in fact no longer spoken at Tugu Village, or Kampung Tugu, North Jakarta. The blend of Portuguese and Malay is more frequently used in the keroncong (Indonesian genre inspired by Portuguese songs) songs that can still be found in Jakarta's Old Town. The keroncong verses, for instance, have many similar sounds that are shared by Portuguese and Tugu creole. The difference lies in the writing of letters, such as 'o' and 'c', which in creole are written as 'u' and 'k'. The word gato (cat), for example, in Tugu creole becomes gatu, or, corto (face) becomes korto.

  • Traces of Hobbits
    Science & Technology

    Traces of Hobbits

    Researchers have unearthed teeth smaller than those of the Homo erectus in Java and the Homo floresiensis found in Flores. The connection between the two is still a mystery.

  • A Majapahit Discovery in Sidoarjo
    Science & Technology

    A Majapahit Discovery in Sidoarjo

    Edi Tri Haryantoro fixed his gaze at a brick-walled ditch at a depth of three meters from the ground surface. Knee-deep water filled the ditch. "This is undoubtedly an ancient irrigation system," the senior archeologist from Mojokerto's cultural preservation center told Tempo on the spot at Urangagung village in Sidoarjo, East Java, late last November.

    The structure walled off by red bricks in the middle of a paddy field was discovered on October 29, 2015. Sugiantono, a local farmer, found the structure while digging a well to water his mung bean plants. When he was digging at a depth of one meter, his hoe hit a mass of red bricks that were much bigger than regular bricks.

  • Papua's Plight
    Science & Technology

    Papua's Plight

    THE cause of the crash of Trigana Air IL-257 plane two weeks ago remains a mystery. "Many factors, including human error and airport geographic conditions (could have been responsible)," said AirNav Indonesia Operations Director Wisnu Darjono on Wednesday last week.

    Eleven minutes before its scheduled landing at 3:06pm, the ATR 42-300 plane lost contact. The following day, the National Search and Rescue Agency (Basarnas) located its wreckage in the forests on the slope of Mount Tangok, some 18 kilometers northwest of Oksibil Airport. None of the 54 passengers survived.

  • Tsunamiprediction
    Science & Technology

    Tsunamiprediction

    An enormous earthquake shook the bottom of the Indian Ocean on Sunday, December 26, 2004. The tectonic tremors of 9.2 on the Richter scale reached the land of Aceh. In less than an hour, sea waves as high as 30 meters rolled in from of the sea. After engulfing Aceh's shores, the waves devastated half of the province and claimed hundreds of thousands of lives.

    "A quake and tsunami of the Aceh [2004] magnitude can potentially recur in the Mentawai Islands, West Sumatra," said Nugroho Dwi Hananto, a geo-technology researcher from the Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI) to Tempo in his office on Friday two weeks ago.

  • Ancient Fossils in the Oya River
    Science & Technology

    Ancient Fossils in the Oya River

    Thirty-three pitch-black stones the size of matches formed a long figure resembling the femur of a ruminating animal. A team of researchers from the Yogyakarta Archeological Center concluded: it came from an ancient buffalo that lived a million years ago.

    Bambang Duhgita, 45, discovered the fossils while searching for precious stones in the Oya River, around 500 meters from his home in Bejiharjo village, Yogyakartaabout 1.5 kilometers from Pindul Cave, a popular tourist destination.

  • Papua's Biological Treasure Trove
    Science & Technology

    Papua's Biological Treasure Trove

    Clear weather prevailed in Urisa village, West Papua. No rain had fallen for two months in the area when a team of researchers from the Lengguru Expedition arrived in early November last year. In Urisa the group was hospitably welcomed by village residents. Small tents and research posts were promptly erected in the middle of the village. Some team members set up a base camp while others dispersed to gather data on plants, insects, birds and reptiles in forests, rivers, lakes and caves.

  • Papua's Biological Treasure Trove
    Science & Technology

    Papua's Biological Treasure Trove

    Clear weather prevailed in Urisa village, West Papua. No rain had fallen for two months in the area when a team of researchers from the Lengguru Expedition arrived in early November last year. In Urisa the group was hospitably welcomed by village residents. Small tents and research posts were promptly erected in the middle of the village. Some team members set up a base camp while others dispersed to gather data on plants, insects, birds and reptiles in forests, rivers, lakes and caves.

    Lina Juswara, a botanical researcher from the Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI), was aware of the very hot weather in Urisa. Still, the team carried on gathering samples. "It would have been a pity to waste time," Lina told Tempo on January 27. The expedition team only stayed in Urisa for four days. On November 7 last year, they plowed ahead via a sea route to the Kumawa Mountains.

  • 'Green Port' in Surabaya
    Science & Technology

    'Green Port' in Surabaya

    East Java Governor Soekarwo smiled broadly in front of the camera inthe multipurpose terminal of Teluk Lamong, Surabaya, on September 5. Behind him dozens of CNG-fueled trucks busily blinked their sign lights. "Mr. President, in 2016, ships with the capacity of 80,000 tons are expected to be able to get into Teluk Lamong," he said.

    The person he was talking to was in a different location, linked to him via a video feed. Pointing to the background, at the towering automated stacking cranes and ship-to-shore cranes in the distance, Soekarwo said East Java was prepared to become a new generator of economic development. "Belated economy of East Java will affect the economy of eastern Indonesia," he said.

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